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Psychotronic Films You Should Watch

This page will be an increasing list of the films that we’ve written about here.

A*P*E

Producers: KM Yeung and Paul Leder
Director: Paul Leder
Screenwriters: Paul Leder and Reuben A Leder
Starring: Rod Arrants, Joanna Kerns, and Lee Nak-hoon

Summary: Parody of King Kong.

See: Writing About A*P*E

Attack of the Puppet People

Producer: Bert I Gordon
Director: Bert I Gordon
Screenwriter: George Worthing Yates (story by Bert I Gordon)
Starring: John Hoyt, John Agar, June Kenney, Michael Mark, and Jack Kosslyn

Summary: A desperately lonely doll maker shrinks people to doll size so that he will never be lonely. Eventually, the dolls attempt to escape.

See: Writing About Attack of the Puppet People

Bloody Mallory

Producers: Oliver Delbosc, Eric Jehelmann, and Marc Missonnier
Director: Julien Magnat
Screenwriters: Julien Magnat and Stéphane Kazandjian (from an original idea by Julien Magnat)
Starring: Olivia Bonamy, Adria Collado, Jeff Ribler, Valentina Vargas, Laurent Spielvogel, Julien Boisselier, and Thylda Barès.

Summary: French demon fighters go in search of kidnapped pope. They are led by Mallory who unknowingly married a demon and then killed him on their wedding night. As a result, she has been corrupted by Evil blood, which she must face in this silly, but oddly profound, fun ride.

See: Writing About Bloody Mallory

Bubba Ho-Tep

Producers: Jason R Savage and Don Coscarelli
Director: Don Coscarelli
Screenwriter: Don Coscarelli (from Joe R Lansdale’s novella)
Starring: Bruce Campbell, Ossie Davis, Ella Joyce, Bob Ivy, and Daniel Roebuck.

Summary: The real Elvis changes places with an Elvis impersonator. Decades later he finds himself in a retirement where a black man who believes he is JFK fight a mummy that is feeding off the souls at the home. It makes more sense than you would think.

See: Writing About Bubba Ho-Tep

Death Bed: The Bed That Eats

Producer: George Barry
Director: George Barry
Screenwriter: George Barry

Summary: A bed is possessed by a demon — or something. Art film mascaraing as horror. A must see.

See: Writing About Death Bed: The Bed That Eats

Horrors of Spider Island

Producers: Gaston Hakim and Wolf C Hartwig
Director: Fritz Böttger
Screenwriter: Fritz Böttger
Starring: Alexander D’Arcy, Helga Franck, Harald Maresch, and Barbara Valentin.

Summary: A dance troupe gets stranded on an island with a large spider. Man turned monster threatens the rest of the female cast. Mostly, a lot of women in their underwear engage in catfights. Better than it sounds..

See: Writing About Horrors of Spider Island

Ishtar

Producer: Warren Beatty
Director: Elaine May
Screenwriter: Elaine May
Starring: Warren Beatty, Dustin Hoffman, Isabelle Adjani, Charles Grodin, and Jack Weston.

Summary: Silly, sweet film about two incompetent songwriters who get caught up in international intrigue while working in Morocco.

See: Writing About Ishtar

Krippendorf’s Tribe

Producer: Larry Brezner
Director: Todd Holland
Screenwriter: Charlie Peters (based on the Frank Parkin novel)

Summary: Screwball comedy about an anthropologist who heals his family’s pain at the loss of their mother by inventing a New Guinea tribe.

See: Writing About Krippendorf’s Tribe

Kolchak: The Night Stalker

Creator: Jeff Rice
Producers: Dan Curtis, Cy Chermak, and Paul Playdon
Director: Various (Notable: Don Weis, Allen Baron, Alex Grasshoff, Don McDougall)
Screenwriters: Various (Notable: Richard Matheson, David Chase, L Ford Neale & John Huff)
Starring: Darren McGavin, Simon Oakland, and many others

Summary: stories of an old style newspaper man who is constantly uncovering bizarre stories that always get suppressed.

See: Writing About Kolchak: The Night Stalker

Night Gallery

Creator: Rod Serling
Producers: Jack Laird and William Sackheim
Director: Various (Notable: Jeannot Szwarc, Jeff Corey, Gene Kearney, Jack Laird, Jerrold Freedman, John Badham, Steven Spielberg, John Astin)
Screenwriters: Various (Notable: Rod Serling, Jack Laird, Gene Kearney, Alvin Sapinsley, Halsted Welles, Richard Matheson)
Starring: Various

Summary: a horror television series featuring between one and four stories per episode. It ran from 1969 through 1973 with a total of 44 episodes, most of them hour long.

See: Writing About Night Gallery

Omega Doom

Producers: Gary Schmoeller and Tom Karnowski
Director: Albert Pyun
Screenwriters: Albert Pyun and Ed Naha
Starring: Rutger Hauer, Anna Katarina, and Norbert Weisser

Summary: A post-apocalyptic remake of Yojimbo. A badass robot, Omega Doom, walks into a town caught in the middle of a war between two rival robot gangs. Omega Doom sets the gangs against each other freeing the town.

See: Writing About Omega Doom

The President’s Analyst

Producer: Stanley Rubin
Director: Theodore J Flicker
Screenwriters: Theodore J Flicker
Starring: James Coburn, Godfrey Cambridge, Severn Darden, Pat Harrington, Walter Burke, and William Daniels.

Summary: a psychiatrist becomes the president’s analyst but finds he can’t take it and runs away. Spies the world over go looking for him Funny social satire.

See: Writing About The President’s Analyst

Robot Monster

Producer: Phil Tucker
Director: Phil Tucker
Screenwriter: Wyott Ordung

Summary: Typical 1950s B sci-fi film, but with a gorilla in a diving helmet as the monster.

See: Writing About Robot Monster

Roger Corman Poe

Producers: Roger Corman, James H Nicholson, and Samuel Z Arkoff
Director: Roger Corman
Screenwriters: Richard Matheson, Charles Beaumont, Ray Russell, R Wright Campbell, Robert Towne, and Paul Mayersberg
Starring: Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Joyce Jameson

Summary: eight films mostly based on Poe stories. All excellent.

See: Writing About Roger Corman Poe Cycle

Space: 1999

Creator: Gerry and Sylvia Anderson
Producers: Gerry Anderson (Executive Producer); Sylvia Anderson (Year One), Fred Freiberger (Year Two)
Director: Various (Notable: Charles Crichton and Val Guest)
Screenwriters: Various (Notable: Johnny Byrne, Terence Feely, Fred Freiberger, Donald James, Christopher Penfold, and Anthony Terpiloff)
Starring: Martin Landau, Barbara Bain, Barry Morse, and Catherine Schell

Summary: a group of people are stranded on Moonbase Alpha after an explosion throws the Moon out of Earth’s gravity, traveling through the universe visiting various planets along the way.

See: Writing About Space: 1999

Turbo Kid

Producers: Anne-Marie Gélinas, Ant Timpson, Benoit Beaulieu, and Tim Riley
Directors: Anouk Whissell, François Simard, and Yoann-Karl Whissell
Screenwriters: Anouk Whissell, François Simard, and Yoann-Karl Whissell
Starring: Munro Chambers, Laurence Leboeuf, Aaron Jeffery, and Michael Ironside.

Summary: In a post-apocalyptic world, a teenager must survive with the help of a “friend robot” Apple and arm wrestling champion Frederic as they fight against authoritarian leader Zeus.

See: Writing About Turbo Kid

Permanent link to this article: http://psychotronicreview.com/films/

A*P*E

A*P*E: Meta-Film of a Fine Vintage In 1976, an odd collection of American and South Korean filmmakers got together to make the 3-D feature A*P*E, a King Kong remake. Most people call it it a knockoff. I call it a parody. And as such, I think it’s a lot better a film than most people …

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Attack of the Puppet People

A New Look at an Old Bert I Gordon Classic Attack of the Puppet People is a Bert I Gordon film from 1958. Gordon is known for his special effects — mostly optical and rear projection. Everyone of my generation knows The Amazing Colossal Man — certainly the film he will be remembered for. Back …

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Bloody Mallory

Bloody Mallory Review, Analysis, and Wow Shortly before 2002, a young Julien Magnat was fresh out of film school. His only claim to fame was an Academy Award nominated short, The All-New Adventures of Chastity Blade. But somehow, he got a bunch of serious and impressive people to help him make his first feature film, …

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Bubba Ho-Tep

Don Coscarelli’s Masterpiece I’m a big fan of Don Coscarelli. At this point, he’s probably best known for Phantasm and its many sequels. But in the long-term, it is likely that Bubba Ho-Tep will be the film that he’s remembered for. It’s a horror comedy, but unlike any one that you’ve ever seen. Like much …

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Death Bed: The Bed That Eats

Death Bed: The Bed That Eats Review and Analysis Four years ago, I was watching The Comedians of Comedy. It is pretty good. It features Maria Bamford who is brilliant and hilarious. Overall, it is worth checking out, but it isn’t great. The event is hosted by Patton Oswalt. At the end of the show, …

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Horrors of Spider Island

Horrors of Spider Island and the Sex-Horror Genre Horrors of Spider Island started its life in 1960 as Ein Toter Hing im Netz, which means roughly “a dead man hung in a web.” It was written and directed by Fritz Böttger. He was trained as a dancer, and had a modestly successful career in front …

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Ishtar

Ishtar Is a Funny Movie — Why Haven’t You Watched it? In an interview Neal Conan did with with Dustin Hoffman, the actor said, “Just about everyone I’ve ever met that makes a face when [Ishtar] is brought up has not seen it.” That does kind of sum up the biggest problem with Ishtar: its …

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Kolchak: The Night Stalker

The Night Stalker Universe This page is dedicated a collection of things. First, there is the television series Kolchak: The Night Stalker, which ran for 20 episodes. And then there are two made for television movies that the series was based on: The Night Stalker (1972) and The Night Strangler (1973). They all star Darren …

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Krippendorf’s Tribe

General Overview of Krippendorf’s Tribe I haven’t gotten around to writing this. The following article is primarily concerned with the problems of film criticism (I use the term lightly). But it does provide a lot of information about the film. I will, however, provide a regular discuss of the film sometime soon. –Frank Moraes Why …

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Night Gallery

Night Gallery is a great example of psychotronic film. But it’s format is all over the place. Unlike Kolchak: The Night Stalker, you can’t really talk about it as a whole. As a result, it is particularly good for this format where we add articles to the page. The approach is scattershot, which is perfect …

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Omega Doom

The Post-Apocalyptic Yojimbo One of my all time favorite films is Akira Kurosawa’s Samurai classic Yojimbo (1961). And given that the film is as good as anyone could want, I have to wonder why it is necessary to make again. Most people are much more familiar with the cowboy version, A Fistful of Dollar (1964). …

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Robot Monster

Everybody Loves Robot Monster In 1953, Phil Tucker made his Hollywood directorial debut with the film Robot Monster. I don’t think there is a person alive with even the slightest interest in film who doesn’t know this film. They may not have seen it, but they know it: it’s the one where the monster is …

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Space: 1999

Great 1970s TV: Space: 1999 For two glorious seasons in the mid-1970s, televisions all over the world got to display Space: 1999. It was the creation of Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, who people of my age know from their marionette science fiction show Thunderbirds. They were the small-scale, Brittish Sid and Marty Krofft. But Space: …

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The President’s Analyst

The President’s Analyst Is a Strange Gem of a Film In 1967, an odd little film was released: The President’s Analyst. It stars James Coburn as the title character, also known as Dr Sidney Schaefer. It’s a reasonably big budget film, released through Paramount Pictures. Like a number of other films at the time, it …

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The Roger Corman Poe Cycle

One of the greatest things in all of psychotronic film is the Roger Corman Poe Cycle. It started in 1960 with House of Usher and ended in 1965 with The Tomb of Ligeia. There were a total of eight films almost always starring Vincent Price, half of them written by Richard Matheson. Most of the …

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Turbo Kid

Turbo Kid: Gory Post-Apocalyptic Nostalgia I saw the 2015 film Turbo Kid the other day. It’s a post-apocalyptic gore fest designed to appeal to people of my age. Really! The film takes place in 1997, but the apocalypse happened in the mid-1980s. It features cool things from earlier times like a Rubik’s Cube and a …

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